RISE Three-part CD Player Keeps Components Safe From...Each Other?

Illustration for article titled RISE Three-part CD Player Keeps Components Safe From...Each Other?

Audiophiles will stop at nothing to reach aural nirvana, which is the only justification for RISE's existence. Hand crafted in Italy, RISE is a CD player in which the various components (power source, control panel, and a Philips CD reader) are stashed in separate aluminum boxes to eliminate all mechanical and electromagnetic interference. Pricing is done on a request-only basis, but like most Italian luxury products, you can rest assured that if you have to ask, you probably can't afford it.

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Illustration for article titled RISE Three-part CD Player Keeps Components Safe From...Each Other?
Illustration for article titled RISE Three-part CD Player Keeps Components Safe From...Each Other?
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Illustration for article titled RISE Three-part CD Player Keeps Components Safe From...Each Other?
Illustration for article titled RISE Three-part CD Player Keeps Components Safe From...Each Other?
Illustration for article titled RISE Three-part CD Player Keeps Components Safe From...Each Other?

[RISE via Gadgetell]

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DISCUSSION

benenglish-old
benenglish

The cited website (needledoctor) is not insane. What's insane is that there are cartridges out there so expensive that wear out so fast that it would be cheaper, on a dollar-per-minute basis, to actually hire Yo-Yo Ma to sit in your living room and play for you as compared to playing his records. The fact that needledoctor is smart enough to make a buck off the audiophile market is admirable.

I say this as someone who has spent more than a little time with a USD$30K turntable. I've spent a lot of time listening to stereo systems that cost twice what I paid for my house. (Hell, you can find *lots* of different speakers that each sell for more than the USD$90K I paid for my house.) I actually appreciate this stuff.

However, I outgrew it a long time ago. My advice to budding audiophiles goes like this, in this order:

1. Get season tickets to the symphony. Much better sound than a million-dollar stereo, more social, and better training for your ears.

2. USD$10K in cannily chosen components will sound better than 99.999% of people can appreciate. If you want to spend more than that, go to step 3.

3. The listening room is a bigger component than you can imagine. When you next build a house, design a good room for that purpose. There are specialty firms that will help you. Once it's designed and built, put your USD$10K system in there and enjoy. A more expensive system can't overcome a bad room; a cheap system (relatively) can sound great in a good room.

4. Only after you've done #1-#3 above should you start considering USD$30K CD players, USD$250K amps, and the like. And if you've got that kind of money, you're probably not wasting your time reading random advice posted to a web site, anyway.