Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

There's an Entire House Crammed Into This Tiny 98-Year-Old Boiler Room

Illustration for article titled Theres an Entire House Crammed Into This Tiny 98-Year-Old Boiler Room

There's residential design, and then there's jigsaw puzzle design. This elegant project by the San Francisco architect Christi Azevedo, who wedged a full guest house into a laundry and boiler room from 1916, falls somewhere in between the two.

Advertisement

Azevedo got her start building custom furniture, fabricating wood and steel pieces herself, which clearly gave her the chops necessary to build a project that required an immense amount of custom hardware. The red brick boiler room that she was commissioned to transform into a guest house, according to Dezeen, has a first floor area of only 93 square feet.

Illustration for article titled Theres an Entire House Crammed Into This Tiny 98-Year-Old Boiler Room
Advertisement

With the dimensions of roughly eight by 11.5 feet—the size of some people's bathrooms—Azevedo was still able to fit everything necessary into the guest home by adding a second level, accessed by a beautiful steel-and-wood ship's ladder.

Illustration for article titled Theres an Entire House Crammed Into This Tiny 98-Year-Old Boiler Room

On the mezzanine guests can access an extremely cozy-looking captain's bed, which hides storage and lighting on hinges and is open to the bottom level but for metal railings.

Illustration for article titled Theres an Entire House Crammed Into This Tiny 98-Year-Old Boiler Room
Advertisement

The bathroom, you ask? According to the architect's info, it's only 42 inches square, and there's even a tiny shower.

Illustration for article titled Theres an Entire House Crammed Into This Tiny 98-Year-Old Boiler Room
Advertisement

As incredible as it is that so much functionality made it into this tiny space, the really lovely part is all the custom fabrication and detailing that clearly went into it. Take a close look at the pictures; more thought was spent planning this tiny space than was probably spent on most full-size houses.

All images used with permission from Azevedo Design.

Advertisement

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

simonstillwellgray
stillwellgray

more thought was spent planning this tiny space than was probably spent on most full-size houses.

sure, but the end result is more effort for less space/product/outcome. and I always assume that the people who are okay living in houses like this are either under 5" tall or spend most of their time camping/RVing/living in a real-sized house.

actually, that's a good question. what's the average occupancy time/rate for these House Juniors? like, is there a crushing claustrophobia that develops after a couple months of never being more than 18 inches from a wall?