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This Is the Largest Stone Block Ever Carved By Human Hands

Illustration for article titled This Is the Largest Stone Block Ever Carved By Human Hands

This may look like a modern civil engineering marvel—but in fact you're looking at the largest known stone block to be tirelessly carved by human hands.

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Discovered in a stone quarry in Baalbek, Lebanon, by German archaeologists, the perfectly hewn chunk of stone measures 64 feet by 19.6 feet and is 18 feet tall. It's estimated to weigh 1,650 tons, making it—according to the researchers— the "biggest stone block from antiquity." The German Archaeological Institute explains:

"The level of smoothness indicate the block was meant to be transported and used without being cut... [But] it would have probably cracked during transportation."

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Indeed, other large stone blocks, all smaller than this one, were found nearby—notably one weighting about 1,240 tons—some of which show signs of damage. That suggests that some were moved, but then the plan abandoned when it was discovered they were too big to transport in safety.

It's believed the stones date back over 2,000 years to at least 27 B.C., and that they were due to be used in one of several major temples under construction at the time. [Deutsches Archäologisches Institut via Discovery]

Image by Deutsches Archäologisches Institut.

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DISCUSSION

moonshadowkati
Moonshadow Kati aka Lady Locksmith

This article states "[...] that some were moved, but then the plan abandoned when it was discovered they were too big to transport in safety." The linked article then goes on to state, regarding another similar mega-stone that was also nearby, that "it was probably left in the quarry because the stone quality at one edge proved to be poor."My question is, if it was too large to transport and one edge of it was (probably) poor quality, why did they not then cut it to a more manageable size and remove the poor quality side? Does anyone have any insight? =)

Edit: Btw, the first link just Googles the Deutsches Archaologisches Institut. Would you like the link for the article (in German),

http://www.dainst.org/transarea-netw…

or the link to their main page at least?

http://www.dainst.org/projekte