Update Your iPhone to iOS 14.6 Now for Major Security Fixes

Illustration for article titled Update Your iPhone to iOS 14.6 Now for Major Security Fixes
Photo: Sam Rutherford

Today Apple released iOS 14.6, which includes some new features for AirTags, support for subscriptions in Apple Podcasts, and most importantly, a number of major security updates for pretty much all modern iPhones, iPads, and iPod Touch devices.

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The big new consumer-facing features in iOS 14.6 are updates that enable Family Sharing for the Apple Card and subscriptions in Apple Podcasts. Meanwhile, AirTags also got a little attention thanks to the ability to “add an email address instead of a phone number for AirTag and Find My network accessories.”

And for Apple Music users, iOS 14.6 also includes support for Dolby Atmos and lossless audio, both of which are expected to live sometime next month.

However, the more pressing part of iOS 14.6 is a whole host of security updates that address a wide range of exploits ranging from things like malicious audio files that could allow hackers to run code or reveal personal information to holes in iOS’ Core Services, which previously were vulnerable to malware that could potentially grant root privileges to bad actors.

The range of Apple’s security updates in iOS 14.6 are so important that they cover almost every major mobile device Apple has made in the past five years, including every iPhone 6s and later, every iPad Pro, every iPad Air 2 and later, every iPad fifth-gen and later, every iPad Mini 4 and later, and every iPod Touch seventh-gen and later.

So even if you don’t have an Apple Card or use Apple Podcasts, it’s highly recommended that every iPhone or iPad owner update to iOS 14.6 as soon as possible.

Senior reporter at Gizmodo, formerly Tom's Guide and Laptop Mag. Was an archery instructor and a penguin trainer before that.

DISCUSSION

saywhatuwill
saywhatuwill

I heard that Apple made the Apple Music app a lot less user friendly by removing the indicator that let the user know if the song was downloaded onto the phone or in the cloud. Now you’ve got to jump through hoops to find out if it is or not. Not cool.