Would This Bike With Storage Inside the Front Wheel Even Be Rideable?

Illustration for article titled Would This Bike With Storage Inside the Front Wheel Even Be Rideable?

They don't need gas, they can weave in and out of traffic, and you don't even need a licence to ride one. But unless you tack on a set of panniers or a basket, bikes are notoriously lacking in storage space; a problem that Industrial Designer David Hotard might have eliminated with his novel Transport bike, which features trunk space inside the bike's front wheel.

Advertisement

Working alongside Matthew Campbell and Edwin Collier, the trio advanced the idea of the hubless bike wheel, but instead of removing the spokes and leaving that space empty, they filled it with a storage compartment made out of lightweight vacuum-formed PET-G plastic. So instead of wearing a backpack or shoulder bag while riding, it can be safely stashed inside the bike's trunk since it's only the front tire that actually spins.

Illustration for article titled Would This Bike With Storage Inside the Front Wheel Even Be Rideable?

Weighing in at around 25 pounds, you're not going to find many cyclists adopting the Transport, but its creators claim that's about as heavy as your average road bike, so it's perfect for commuters.

They also point out that since the modified front tire is made from lightweight plastic, it weighs the same as a standard road bike tire too—except that doesn't take into account the weight of the extra crap you toss in there. Once a backpack filled with a laptop, clothing, and other daily accessories is stuffed inside, that front wheel is bound to feel quite a bit different, particularly when cornering. What do you think? Let us know your thoughts in the discussion below, could this creation actually improve a biker's daily commute? [David Hotard via Damn Geeky]

Illustration for article titled Would This Bike With Storage Inside the Front Wheel Even Be Rideable?

DISCUSSION

riselikelions
Luke Ryder

As with the vast majority of Gizmodo's bicycle-related content, this is a solution searching desperately for a problem. What happens if you get a puncture? Why isn't a basket a perfectly reasonable option? How does it handle when faced with a strong crosswind? What kind of clearance is there between the wheel and the casing, and what happens if the wheel goes slightly out of true? How easy will it be to access the valve to pump the tyre? How much will this cost? Why wouldn't a cyclist just use a backpack, or panniers?

So much of the bike-related content on Gizmodo seems to be stuff designed by people who have no idea of the day-to-day needs and habits of cyclists. How much of it has made it to market and not bombed horribly?