10 Gadgets That Have No Business Using a Jet EngineS
Ever since we started putting high-powered engines into jets, there has been a long line of skilled but misguided lunatics eager to rip them out to use in their stupid and dangerous contraptions. Simply put, we are fascinated by speed—whether it is the latest military super aircraft or a flaming toilet blazing down the road at 70 mph. A jet engine attached to anything is sure-fire entertainment—as the following ten gadgets will demonstrate. Jet-Powered Toilet: Powered by a Boeing Jet engine, this outhouse can reach speeds in excess of 70 mph—giving it the distinction of being the "fastest toilet in the world." The way I see it, that puts inventor Paul Stender on the same level as Chuck Yeager. [Link] Jet-Powered Bicycle: Robert Maddox has a unique hobby—he builds and sells pulse jet engines. He is also a man that understands the value of a little viral marketing. That's why he decided to strap one of his kerosene-powered pulse jet engines onto an old-timey bicycle and ride it down uneven country roads at speeds up to 75mph. [Link] Jet-Powered Kayak: A race between a jet-powered Kayak and a souped up off-road vehicle? Man, I love Top Gear. [Link] 10 Gadgets That Have No Business Using a Jet EngineJet-Powered Grocery Cart: Using pulse jet engine instructions he found on the internet, a microlight instructor named Andy Tyler fashioned a grocery cart deathtrap that can reach speeds of around 50 mph. [The Sun] 10 Gadgets That Have No Business Using a Jet EngineSJet-Powered Wheelchair: A grocery cart that can hit 50 mph is impressive, but it doesn't compare to a wheelchair that can do 60. Next up—attaching a jet engine to a Rascal to help Grandma retain her independence. [Link] Click to view Jet-Powered Rollerskates: An Aston Martin V8 Vantage vs a guy on rollerskates with a 300 horsepower jet engine strapped to his back? Yeah, Top Gear again. Jet-Powered School Bus: Apparently, this heavily modified school bus is packing a 40-50's era Westinghouse J-34 Turbojet under that bright yellow exterior. These engines were capable of producing at least 3000 pounds of thrust—but since the bus never moves it's hard to tell how fast you could get to school riding in this thing. [King on Wheels and Hacked Gadgets] 10 Gadgets That Have No Business Using a Jet EngineSJet-Powered Scooter: I've been seeing a lot more scooters on the road in the States since gas prices became an issue—usually lumbering down the road in front of me when I'm trying to get somewhere in a hurry. That woudn't be a problem with this modified version however. The addition of two JFS 100 jet engines should get this little guy going over 40 mph no problem. [Ron Patrick Stuff] Jet-Powered Road Luge: Using a small 90,000-rpm jet engine, luge rider Joel King was able to hit a world record top speed of 112 mph. [Link] Jet-Powered Minivan: Traditionally, getting a minivan is a sign that your youth and freedom has given way to a fully suburbanized/domesticated lifestyle filled with PTA meetings, landscaping issues and grocery store coupons. At least one man, Chris Krug, decided to fight back by installing a Rolls-Royce Nimbus helicopter jet turbine engine with 1,000 shaft horsepower at 2,100 RPM into his Dodge Caravan. [Link] Bonus: The previous ten gadgets dealt with jet engines being misused as a mode of transportation. Truth be told, it's probably not a good idea to use one to start a bonfire either. Although you can't argue with the results. [Link]