190,000 Ceiling Fans Recalled After Blades Flew Off and Hit People

Illustration for article titled 190,000 Ceiling Fans Recalled After Blades Flew Off and Hit People
Image: CPSC

More than 190,000 fans sold at Home Depot in the United States and Canada have been recalled by the manufacturer because the blades can detach, fly through the air, and hit people.

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The recalled fan is the Hampton Bay 54 in. Mara Indoor/Outdoor ceiling fan, which was sold exclusively at Home Depot and via its online store for around $150. On Dec. 23, fan-maker King of Fans issued a notice of the recall to its “valued customers” who have not yet been decapitated by projectile fan blades.

Approximately 182,000 of these dangerous fans were sold in the U.S. between April and October, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). Another 8,800 were also sold in Canada, the agency said. King of Fans said the disconnecting blades are the result of an “isolated manufacturing defect with the assembly of the fan blade’s locking clip to the fan flywheel, where two of the screws retaining the locking clip is not adequately secured to the flywheel. If this occurs, the blade may detach from the fan during use, posing an injury hazard.”

The CPSC said the company received 47 reports of the fan blades detaching. Of those, four reports claimed the flying blades caused property damage and two were reports “of the fan blade hitting a consumer.” CPSC further instructs owners of the bad fan to stop using it immediately. If, instead, you continue to use the fan but “observe blade movement or uneven gaps between the blades and fan body or movement of the clip during inspection, consumers should immediately contact King of Fans for a free replacement ceiling fan,” CPSC said.

King of Fans said anyone who finds that they have the recalled Mara 54 in. fan should contact the company by phone at 1-866-443-1291, via email at mararecall@kingoffans.com, or scan the QR code found here. However, considering the King of Fans website prominently features a giant, now-nonfunctioning Flash animation as the near-entirety of its homepage, we’d recommend going with the lowest-tech option available to get your new, not-violently-defective ceiling fan.

Deputy Editor, Gizmodo

DISCUSSION

imnotdedyet
David E. Davis

This is why you have procedures for daily torque checks on you’re screw guns.