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A Sleek Wireless Thermostat You Might Actually Want To Frame

Illustration for article titled A Sleek Wireless Thermostat You Might Actually Want To Frame

Better known for the company's hardware that reports the weather outside, Netatmo has teamed up with Philippe Starck to create a new device that gives you complete control over the climate inside your home from your smartphone. And unlike similar wireless thermostats from Honeywell and Nest, Starck has ensured that Netatmo's offering doesn't overcomplicate things.

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In fact the wall mounted hardware uses a simple e-ink screen to display just the desired temperature, and the actual temperature in your home. And in lieu of obvious buttons, the display's frame can be clicked up and down to make adjustments as needed. It even comes with interchangeable colored frames so the hardware matches the curtains—literally.

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Illustration for article titled A Sleek Wireless Thermostat You Might Actually Want To Frame

But to take full advantage of the thermostat, you'll want to add an iOS or Android device into the mix. The accompanying app lets users monitor the current temperature in their home—from anywhere—make real-time adjustments, schedule temperature changes, and even monitor their energy usage over time.

The app can even learn your personal habits, like when you're away or what times of day you prefer certain temperatures, and attempt to stay one step ahead while keeping your home's energy usage as efficient as it can be. In other words, while the hardware will set you back around $240, in the long run it could actually end up saving you more money than it costs. [Netatmo via designboom]

Illustration for article titled A Sleek Wireless Thermostat You Might Actually Want To Frame
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DISCUSSION

Do any of these check the weather forecast and try to move temperature settings changes forward or back an hour or two to try to take advantage of external temps? Or take into account which hours electricity more expensive?

To me, stuff like that is the real potential for intelligent thermostats. It learning my habits and following them by rote is no different than me programming a cheap thermostat. Its a cheap party trick in an expensive package, otherwise.