The app starts by taking its best shot at colorizing a black and white source image it’s been fed, and in the process it creates a small palette of suggested colors. The user can then refine the colorization process by adding simple color markers to the source image. For example, they can specify a plant is a certain shade of green, or choose a specific skintone color for a person, just by placing tinted dots right on the source image in the app.

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The neural network continues to work away in the background, updating the colorized results every time a new marker is added by a user. So instead of having to spend hours in Photoshop painstakingly painting in hundreds of different shades, the colorization process happens in just minutes. It’s intelligent enough to limit where colors are applied, so a handful of dots are all that’s needed to bring an image to life.

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Want to try it for yourself? There’s no word on when or if Adobe plans to include capabilities like this directly in Photoshop, but Zhang has made his Interactive Deep Colorization app available for download on GitHub if you want to take a stab at colorizing some cherished photos of your great grandparents.

Update: The photo captions in this article have been updated to credit both the research team that colorized the photos as well as the photographers of the original images.