First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and AT&T

Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT

Click to viewIt was bound to happen. It seems that a guy called Trujillo has been the first to file a class-action suit against Apple and AT&T because of the iPhone. The reason? You guessed it—it's the battery. Read all about this dumbtastically stupid lawsuit, including the entire complaint text, after the jump.

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Trujillo, hopefuly not related to the former Dominican dictator, claims that he didn't know that the battery is a "sealed unit with it's [sic] battery soldered inside" and that:

The battery enclosed in the iPhone can only be charged approximately 300 times before it will be in need of replacement, necessitating a new battery annually for owners of the iPhone.

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Putting aside that this guy's lawyer's grammar is worse than mine, is he really that ignorant? Does he think that the judge is going to be stupid? (OK, you don't need to answer that. It was a rhetorical question.)

The fact is that the iPhone battery lasts for more than "300" charges and doesn't need to be changed after that. According to Apple, the battery "is designed to retain up to 80% of its original capacity after 400 full charge and discharge cycles."

Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
Illustration for article titled First iPhone Class-Action Suit Against Apple and ATT
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[Thanks Chop]

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DISCUSSION

The lawsuit is frivolous and stupid, yes, but let's be careful with saying the particulars of the lawsuit are inaccurate. Nobody knows at what point iPhones will need to have a replacement battery, but I have a finsky that says that some (not all - but some) owners will start replacing batteries before a year is out because they are not holding a reasonable charge.

The reason I toss that out there is because we have had hundreds of smart phones (primarily Treo devices) through our office, and replacing the battery is very common. When looking at the battery type in the iPhone it is identical to what everyone else is using. So, based on that, we can assume that the iPhone battery life will last a similar amount of time. How long is that?

(Wait for it) .. About a year.

And while I am completely disgusted with the lawsuit, the fact remains that Steve Jobs made a mistake not allowing the battery to be user replaceable. Hell, he soldered the damn thing down, didn't he? Sounds like they wanted to make the replacement process as difficult as possible. So, yes, if we are handing out idiot scores, the folks filing the lawsuit get a few points, but so does Apple.