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Microvision Handheld Pico Projector Can Drive a 100-inch Image

Illustration for article titled Microvision Handheld Pico Projector Can Drive a 100-inch Image

If you really must have a way to watch those four seasons of Futurama DVDs anywhere you go, this Microvision SHOW handheld projector is the way to go. Not only is it about the size of a first or second-gen iPod, it can shoot out a 848x480 image (DVD quality) that's anywhere from 12-inches to 100-inches in size. It will have a 2.5-hour battery life, and runs off of their PicoP display engine. We'll have to see just how good this thing is at CES, but anyone who's interested in pulling out a projection show anywhere should be hot to trot over this bad boy. [BusinessWire]

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DISCUSSION

@jibbly: "I don't know where you're getting your info from, but 2500-4000 lumens is blindingly bright for CE projectors. A typical home theater projector set up properly for watching movies in a dark room will be around 300-400. With ambient light you'd want to bump it up to 1,000-2,000 lumens."

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More careful examination of the links from the microvision web site reveals the following:

[phx.corporate-ir.net]

" Designed for viewing high-quality projected images in a variety of controlled lighting environments" (this means DARK room)

[www.eetimes.com]

Russell Hannigan, senior product marketing manager at Microvision: "We arrange it so the image is always in focus—with no need to adjust it with a lens—from about 200 millimeters [8 inches] to maybe two meters [80 inches] away, so you can literally move the image from the wall to the ceiling and it will always be in focus," ... The main disadvantage of Microvison's pico-projector is that it only has a brightness of about 10 lumens—compared with 100 lumens or more for suitcase-sized digital projectors offered today.

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From reading that, it sure sounds like they're talking about a small image projected 100 inches AWAY, not a 100 inch image.