Seized Fyre Fest Merch Is Going Up for Auction

Illustration for article titled Seized Fyre Fest Merch Is Going Up for Auction
Image: Gaston&Sheehan

An enthralling catalogue of vintage crime memorabilia has exploded on the page of a small Texas auction house today, entitled “Fyre Festival fraud scheme”: 126 lots of butt-ugly merchandise from the scam music festival that never was, ranging from hats to wristbands to hoodies to jogger sweats. Two documentaries, a class-action lawsuit, and a six-year prison sentence later, it may just be your last chance to get a piece of the action with a 0% buyer’s premium and an average valuation of $15 (a significant markdown from $100-range price tags pictured).

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Illustration for article titled Seized Fyre Fest Merch Is Going Up for Auction
Image: Gaston&Sheehan

They have a certain windswept, blown-out-of-the-side-window-and-run-over-in-a-car-chase quality.

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Illustration for article titled Seized Fyre Fest Merch Is Going Up for Auction
Image: Gaston&Sheehan
Illustration for article titled Seized Fyre Fest Merch Is Going Up for Auction
Image: Gaston&Sheehan
Illustration for article titled Seized Fyre Fest Merch Is Going Up for Auction
Image: Gaston&Sheehan

But what is the provenance of these items?

According to Southern District of New York U.S. Marshal Ralph Sozio, the branded hoodies and such were part of yet another plot Fyre Festival founder Billy McFarland had hatched leading up to his trial.

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“This Fyre Festival-branded clothing and other items that were seized from Billy McFarland were originally intended to be sold at the Fyre Festival itself but were kept by McFarland, with the intent to sell the items and use the funds to commit further criminal acts while he was on pre-trial release,” reads an announcement on the U.S. Marshals site, which raises so many more questions than it answers.

The proceeds will now go to the victims of McFarland’s crimes.

And the same items you could have wasted in the pouring rain on a godforsaken lot outside a FEMA tent can now be preserved in your closet as a piece of history.

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Staff reporter, Gizmodo. wkimball @ gizmodo

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DISCUSSION

The merch is not so 🔥🔥🔥