If you like Chrome but don’t think it loads web pages fast enough, you might be in luck. Google has now readied a new compression algorithm for the browser which will squeeze web pages down by as much as 25 percent more than it does right now.

The new algorithm, called Brotli, is designed to replace the one that Chrome currently uses, known as Zopfli. (Google has always sucked at naming things—in this case, Brötli means ‘small bread’ in Swiss German.) It’s been in the works for a while, but the code is now ready to roll, according to Google’s Ilya Grigorik.

Google claims that it uses a “whole new data format” that manages to squeeze down web page content by an impressive amount—apparently squashing HTML, CSS and JavaScript down by 17-25 percent more than Zopfli.

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It does that while also achieving comparable decompression speeds which, it might not surprise you to hear, “allows for better space utilization and faster page loads.” Google also reckons it will provide “benefits to mobile users, such as lower data transfer fees and reduced battery use.” Sounds good, eh?

The code is now said to be readied to the stage of “intent to ship,” which means it should appear in Chrome very soon. Good news for the impatient.

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[Google via Engadget]

Image by Graham Smith