The Real-Life, $150 Star Trek Tricorder Is One Step Closer To RealityS

Late last year we told you about Scanadu and its real-life tricorder, called the SCOUT. Within 10 seconds of direct contact to your left temple, the SCOUT analyzes, records and spits back your vitals, including temperature, respiratory rate, ECG, blood pressure (systolic, diastolic), stress and oximetry levels. Today, Scanadu is announcing three upgrades to the once futuristic tool, in addition to an update to Project ScanaFlo, a disposable urine analysis device.

On the SCOUT front, the gadget's overall outer design has been modified putting the sensors up front and is more rounded than before. Specs have also been revamped to include a 32-bit processor and is built on top of Micrium, the same system NASA uses for SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) aboard the Rover Curiosity. SCOUT can also analyze more than one being now.

A slew of sensors from accelerometers to IR sensors to microphones allow the SCOUT to scan and analyze one's vitals but Scanadu founder Walter de Brouwer tells me that other functionality is possible with a simple update to the device's firmware.

As apart of today's announcement, Scanadu is also launching an indiegogo campaign for SCOUT with the goal of $100,000. SCOUT will set you back $200 but the first thousand backers need only spend $150 with a projected Q1 2014 shipping timeframe. Though the SCOUT isn't FDA approved yet, the goal of the campaign and hope is that early adopters will aid in Scanadu's march towards approval by providing useful data feedback and testing. Other perks for early adopters will also include a trip to NASA as a "citizen astronaut for a space medicine workshop".

The Real-Life, $150 Star Trek Tricorder Is One Step Closer To RealityS

Also included with the SCOUT will be two ScanaFLO paddles. Current day urine analysis is apparently not an easy thing to analyze or interpret, according to Scanadu Research Director Aaron Rowe. Paired with your smartphone, ScanaFLO will be able to test for pregnancy, protein, leukocyte, nitrate, blood, bilirubin, glucose and pH levels, among others. [Indiegogo via Scanadu]