Illustration for article titled 8 Unfortunate Vintage Candy Wrappers

According to a recent article on Smithsonian.com, the notion that poison candy is routinely distributed to unsuspecting children on Halloween is a myth perpetrated by advice columnists Dear Abby and Ann Landers in the 1980s and ’90s. But historically, candy meant for young consumers has sported poisonous-sounding, WTF wrappers and packages that most self-respecting 2013 parents would be dismayed to see dumped out of their children’s trick-or-treat bags. [CandyWrapperMuseum.com, Collecting Candy.com, CandyWrapperArchive.com, and Pez.com.]

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By themselves, these brand names are reasonably innocuous, but together?

Illustration for article titled 8 Unfortunate Vintage Candy Wrappers
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For children who are trying to kick the candy habit, I suppose.

Illustration for article titled 8 Unfortunate Vintage Candy Wrappers

Another product whose brand has fun, fun, fun with drug addiction.

Illustration for article titled 8 Unfortunate Vintage Candy Wrappers
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Tough to know where to start with this one...

Illustration for article titled 8 Unfortunate Vintage Candy Wrappers
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At least the copy writer of this candy's packaging had the good sense to put the word "flavor" below the word "chocolate" rather than "babies."

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A candy classic from back in the days when nuclear weapons were cool.

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Candy disguised as a toxic cleaning product. What could possibly go wrong?

Illustration for article titled 8 Unfortunate Vintage Candy Wrappers
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Saving the best for last, in 1965, Pez made a replica of James Bond's Walther PPK handgun for a dispenser. Yes, children were encouraged to put the pistol in their mouths and pull the trigger.

Illustration for article titled 8 Unfortunate Vintage Candy Wrappers
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