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Apple Running Top 500 Supercomputer at NAB?

Illustration for article titled Apple Running Top 500 Supercomputer at NAB?

Apple Insider got an "inside" look at Apple's NAB setup. They reported that Apple's server included 3/4 Petabytes of storage space, 3 miles of fiber optic cable, 4 M2 Gb networks, 90 Xserves and 40 Xserve RAIDs. Pardon me while I change my pants.

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An interesting point was brought up on MacSlash:

There are systems on the list of the Top 500 Supercomputers with fewer and/or slower processors and slower network connections. Who knows? With a little reconfiguration and optimization for the LINPACK benchmark, maybe, just maybe... Just a little something for you to ruminate on while you marvel at the report's pretty pictures.

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Hit the jump for more pictures of Apple's ubersetup.

Illustration for article titled Apple Running Top 500 Supercomputer at NAB?
Illustration for article titled Apple Running Top 500 Supercomputer at NAB?

Just how important is the professional video market to Apple? You tell me.

High Quality Photos of Apple at NAB 2007 [via MacSlash]

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DISCUSSION

"There has to be a way so that you can use PC servers....blah blah blah...."

Fact #1: Feature for feature, the XServe is cheaper than virtually all comparable Windows solutions.

"This is why most of the market is Windows and/or Linux OS."

Fact #2: No. The reason why most of the market is Windows and/or Linux is because Windows and Linux servers require more human intervention than a Mac OS server. Less human intervention means fewer staff, fewer staff means fewer corporate dollars making its way into IT budgets. The typical moronic head of the IT department will take the crappier solution that keeps money in their budget, rather than the better solution that reduces it — particularly when the head of the IT department can hold a particular company responsible for the upkeep of the system. When a Windows server dies, it usually dies because Windows exploded. When a Mac OS server dies, it usually dies because of hardware failure.