Draw Your Own Crappy Furniture in Real Space

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This image was lost some time after publication.

Are you an "artist" who likes to wear all black, and because of being so spiritual/misunderstood/poor refuses to go to normal store to buy furniture? You might want to check out the Sketch Furniture Project by FRONT.

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Using motion capture, a computer records your pen strokes and places them real-time within the scene. This motion capture is finalized as a 3D image file and then sent through the Rapid Protyping process. A laser hardens liquid plastic 0.1mm at a time, and in a few hours you have a chair that will shock/impress/probably kill your friends. Awesome. Hit the jump for pictures and a video of the entire process. And maybe some brilliant commenter can explain to us why the girl on the right draws slower than her sketch appears...maybe the motion cap is feeding faster than the video? Thanks Mr. JustElite!

Sketch Your Furniture in the Air [gadgetsworld]

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DISCUSSION

Yes, the video has been edited. The motion capture visualization has been composited on top of the video of the women sketching. Sure, you could match the speed of the motion capture overlay to the video, but it would take days. My guess is, that the motion capture skipped "frames" where the position of the pens didn't change, whereas the video just runs a certain fps. Hence, the motion capture will run faster.

Also, since the woman on the right is in front of where the other one is sketching, they could have either have composited the motion capture on top of the woman in the foreground (which would look weird), not showig the motion path (as they did), or spending days manually masking the paths, so it'd look like the woman on the right steps in front of the paths.

Lastly, this is a very creative setup, and I'm sorry to say that those with "design talent" (which is in the eye of the beholder, DazB) do sketch like this. That's it. That's how designers come up with their furniture. Only it's usually done on paper, so this is effectively just short-circuiting the process. I'm sorry, Mark, that you feel so threatened by a little design creativity, that you need to mock it...