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The Federal Trade Commission has filed a complaint against the operators of MyEx.com, a website that encourages people to upload photos and information about their ex. The FTC and the state of Nevada are charging the operators for uploading explicit images of people without their consent. Revenge porn has been a criminal offense in Nevada since October 2015.

According to the complaint, there were about 12,620 entries—which include both photos and personal information—uploaded to the website as of December 2017, and the FTC claims that the defendants knew that “many of the individuals” had entries posted onto the website without their consent. The defendants include EMP Media, Inc., Aniello “Neil” Infante, Shad “John” Applegate, “and one or more unknown parties doing business as Yeicox Ltd.”

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The complaint alleges that the MyEx.com entries include information like victims “name, address, employer, and social media account information,” and that the defendants made victims pay from $499 to $2,800 to have the entries removed from the website. According to the complaint, some victims lost their jobs and experienced online harassment after having their photos and personal information posted on the site.

The site had been advertised with the text “MyEx GET REVENGE!,” the FTC’s complaint states.

“MyEx.com uses reprehensible tactics to profit off of the intimate details of individuals’ private lives,” Acting FTC Chairman Maureen K. Ohlhausen said in a statement released Tuesday. “People who were featured on this site suffered real harm, including the loss of money they paid to remove intimate images and personal information, loss of jobs, and being subject to threats and harassment.”

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This isn’t the first time the FTC has investigated the site. In February 2017, the Commission asked the US District Court to order Infante to cooperate with its investigation into MyEx.com. He failed to appear for his December 2016 US Attorney hearing. The FTC’s petition to the US District Court noted that users uploading entries to MyEx.com have the option to tag photos “with a predetermined array of descriptive—and some demeaning—epithets, including ‘Bad in Bed,’ ‘Broke,’ ‘Cheater,’ ‘Gold Digger,’ and ‘Slut,’” WFMJ.com reported.

The FTC’s complaint filed today states that it “has approved a proposed settlement” with Infante, which bans him from distributing someone’s nonconsensual photos or personal information online, as well as requires him to “destroy all such intimate images and personal information in his possession.” Infante is prohibited from making revenge porn victims pay a fee to have their photos and information removed online. Infante also agreed to a $205,000 judgment, which will be suspended if he pays $15,000, if he can’t afford the total payment. That money will go towards victims charged to have their entries removed from the website.

Revenge porn isn’t isolated to websites dedicated to the gross invasion of privacy. It’s an issue permeating the web, which is why it’s crucial laws on both state and federal levels are established to protect victims. And aside from legal measures, tech companies are grappling with the issue. Facebook, for example, is testing out a new system that allows individuals to get ahead of a revenge porn attack. It allows users to upload explicit photos of themselves to the service that they don’t want posted online—that way, if someone else tries to upload the same image to the social network, it will be detected and automatically removed from the site. But it’s still incredibly difficult for revenge porn victims to ensure their privacy remains intact when websites are built around the steadfast purpose of smearing and harassing victims.

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