GorillaPad Goes Magnetic, Letting You Attach a Tripod to Your Fridge

Illustration for article titled GorillaPad Goes Magnetic, Letting You Attach a Tripod to Your Fridge

GorillaPod, the bendy tripods you know and love, just announced its newest version: GorillaPod Magnetic. This guy has magnets on each of its feet, allowing you to stick it to pretty much any magnetic surface.

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Of course, it'll still work without sticking to a surface, as it's still a normal GorillaPod above the feet. But if you feel the need to have your camera attached to the side of your car door, well, now you've got the ability to. It'll be available in April.

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DISCUSSION

Me, I am waiting for the Geckopod.

"A doormat-sized piece of a new, ultra-adhesive material is so strong that it could suspend the weight of a family car, according to researchers.

Called Synthetic Gecko, the glueless material could be used for instant repair patches for damaged structures - such as fuel tanks - as well as in the manufacture of super-grip tyres and many other applications.

...

The sticky surface is inspired by the gecko - a reptile whose ability to scurry up vertical glass panels and walls has intrigued people for centuries and inspired comic-book characters such as Spider-Man. "

[www.cosmosmagazine.com]

Or I might wait for the reversible wet/dry adhesive inspired by mussels and geckospod.

"Here we report a hybrid biologically inspired adhesive consisting of an array of nanofabricated polymer pillars coated with a thin layer of a synthetic polymer that mimics the wet adhesive proteins found in mussel holdfasts. Wet adhesion of the nanostructured polymer pillar arrays increased nearly 15-fold when coated with mussel-mimetic polymer.

The system maintains its adhesive performance for over a thousand contact cycles in both dry and wet environments. This hybrid adhesive, which combines the salient design elements of both gecko and mussel adhesives, should be useful for reversible attachment to a variety of surfaces in any environment."

[www.nature.com]