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Of Course Ivanka Trump Tweeted About Juicero

Image: Twitter
Image: Twitter

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I love Juicero. I love this dumb, insanely over-engineered, $400 juice squeezing machine that works marginally better than using your own hands. And it turns out I may share that passion with the nation’s First Daughter, Ivanka Trump.

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As pointed out by several Twitter users, in March 2016, Ivanka tweeted about her love for the trendy, embattled startup:

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Yes, please, indeed.

We should also point out here that according to CrunchBase and reports from the time, Thrive Capital—the venture capital firm of Ivanka Trump’s brother-in-law, Joshua Kushner—invested in Juicero in March 2016.

In fact, Ivanka Trump has tweeted quite a few times about companies that Thrive invested in, according to CrunchBase’s records.

There’s Glossier:

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And Warby Parker:

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And IntoTheGloss:

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We should also also point out here that the FTC has very clear guidelines about the use of sponsored content. While it’s unclear if these tweets are indeed #sponcon, the fact that Ivanka’s husband Jared Kushner was a member of Thrive’s board until this January—and received millions in capital gains income from the firm, according to his financial disclosure forms—sure is interesting!

More importantly than all this ethics shit, though, is this: Does Ivanka use Juicero, and has she ever squeezed the bag herself, against Juicero’s strongest recommendations? We have emailed both Ivanka Trump and Juicero for comment and will update if they respond.

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Splinter politics writer. libby.watson@splinternews.com

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DISCUSSION

56metalking
Still Cat from MA

I read through the information at the FTC Guidelines link given in the opening post, and she is CLEARLY violating its provisions. For example, this paragraph:

The FTC’s Endorsement Guides provide that if there is a “material connection” between an endorser and an advertiser – in other words, a connection that might affect the weight or credibility that consumers give the endorsement – that connection should be clearly and conspicuously disclosed, unless it is already clear from the context of the communication. A material connection could be a business or family relationship, monetary payment, or the gift of a free product. Importantly, the Endorsement Guides apply to both marketers and endorsers.”

What I want to know is, what are the penalties and who will prosecute?