Happy Thursday. I’ve got a collection of apps to feast your eyeballs on, little bits of software that makes shipping, photo curation, and GIF selfies (which I guess is a thing) way easier. You can also download some free apps to make boring messaging more creative or some simple utility apps that measure the performance of your personal pocket computer. Check. It. Out.


Multiplatform

Peership

Shipping stuff sucks. It’s a universal truth. But it doesn’t have to be this way, at least Peership doesn’t think so. The idea is simple. Need something shipped or delivered? Request whatever you want in Peership with a suggested amount for how much you’re willing to pay for delivery, and anyone on the app can accept your request. Maybe they stop by the grocery store and your apartment on the way home for a few extra bucks. The community is regulated through a rating system, much like ride share services like Uber or Lyft. It’s a pretty nifty idea, just make sure your delivery guy has a stellar delivery rating before trusting him or her with any precious cargo. [Free for Android and iOS + fees for shipping]

Kong

Why send a selfie when you can send a ...GIFie? Ok, I hope that doesn’t catch on, I’m sorry. Kong is an app that animates the average selfie by making quick GIFs of your beautiful mug super easy. You can add friends to the app and also export to other social media. The interface is super simple and straightforward. It’s worth at least some brief experimentation if GIFs are something you’re in to. [Free for Android and iOS]


Android

SlidePick

Being one of Gizmodo’s main smartphone reviewers, my camera roll is always (thankfully) empty. But if you’re like the millions of normal people out there who happen to own a smartphone for more than two weeks, your photo collection can become quite the space-hogging nightmare of blurry drunk photos and finger-over-lens mistakes. SlidePick Tinderifies the experience of going through your camera roll so you can create more space fast and easy or erase all those ex-relationship selfies. You know, whatever you’re up to. [Free]

Castro

Castro is an app that’s constantly giving your smartphone a checkup. It displays general information on the home screen, but tap the hamburger icon and you check CPU performance, battery healthy, available memory, and live reports of RAM usage. If you want the dirty details on why your battery sucks or your phone is fucking up in some other way, Castro can provide a diagnosis. [Free]


iOS

Sketchat

This week we saw a mini renaissance for the written word. Google introduced a handwriting input update to its keyboard, and Sketchat popped up for iOS. Sketchat is exactly what it sounds like, equal parts chat and sketch. Although the idea is by no means new, it’s implementation here is subtly different than what’s come before. It wastes less time looking for certain colors, stickers, or whatever, and instead tries to replicate the old pen and paper days of old. There is something strangely more intimate about receiving a drawn picture or written note instead of a text message. [Free]

SnapSolve

Man, if I was in high school nowadays, the two apps I’d download immediately would be PhotoMath and SnapSolve. Like PhotoMath, which takes a picture of a math problem and then the solves it, SnapSolve has the same approach but spans across different topics. It’s also monetized. The app will charge nothing for easy questions, which I’m pretty sure falls under Algebra 101. The most it will cost to answer a question is $10. I wonder what happens when you ask the app to solve the Goldbach Conjecture. [Free w/ fees]

Windows Phone

Briefcase

Briefcase is a free file manager for Windows Phone that keeps track of locally stored files on your device and OneDrive. It also has a crap ton of extra features like 4-digit passcode protection, shortcut tiles to your favorite files, and app customization. Pretty much worth it considering its price tag of free. [Free]

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