This Cheap, Recyclable Passive House Assembles Like Lego

Illustration for article titled This Cheap, Recyclable Passive House Assembles Like Lego

The Passive House movement is a wonderful thing. What could be wrong with a voluntary standard that encourages people to make their houses as energy efficient as possible? Well, it's complicated.

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No seriously, these things are really hard to build. That's what makes the Pop-Up House so interesting. Designed by French architecture firm multipod studio, this Passive House-compliant three bedroom home requires almost no additional heating. It's basically built out of insulation. More specifically, it's built out of insulating blocks that fit together like Lego. Wood panels wrap around the outside, and the whole thing is recyclable.

Illustration for article titled This Cheap, Recyclable Passive House Assembles Like Lego

Perhaps more importantly, the Pop-Up House is cheap to build. The architects don't say exactly how much it costs to build, but they do boast about the use of inexpensive materials and short assembly time. How short? Multipod just posted a video of a complete assembly in the south of France that took just four days from bare ground to complete house. And get this: the only tool they needed to build it was an electric screwdriver.

So, let's sum all that up. Some French geniuses have designed a house that's cheap, assembles like Lego, can be recycled, costs very little, and looks pretty awesome? And you can build it with nothing but a screwdriver and your bare hands? I'll take three, please. [multipod]

Illustration for article titled This Cheap, Recyclable Passive House Assembles Like Lego
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Illustration for article titled This Cheap, Recyclable Passive House Assembles Like Lego
Illustration for article titled This Cheap, Recyclable Passive House Assembles Like Lego
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DISCUSSION

I'm interested how they handle the plumbing/ electrical. I don't recall seeing any of that in the assembly video (I'm guessing they forgo that in this video). I see on their plans they have it shown but the layout is also very poor from just a plumbing perspective.

And not to be a Debbie downer here but none of those windows were egress, meaning it would never pass code.

Plus you'd need a licensed electrician to wire it up to you (if you even have a box near by).

In all honesty that's a great idea but I'm dubious about the longevity of the materials as well as the capacity to hold up in inclement weather as well as the base design. I see much more potential in the shipping container preassembled homes or even more traditional premade homes that come in wall sections, with a dedicated crew those can go up in a day or two and are actually weather resistant and permanent.

Again Bravo on the concept and the ability to get the funding to make a prototype, I just don't think this is the best possibility for prefab homes at the moment.