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WeWork Reportedly Wants T-Mobile CEO John Legere to Take Over Its Cursed Company

Illustration for article titled WeWork Reportedly Wants T-Mobile CEO John Legere to Take Over Its Cursed Company
Photo: Getty

T-Mobile CEO John Legere may be considering hanging up his magenta regalia for good.

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The Wall Street Journal reports that the brazen Batman-obsessed executive is in talks with WeWork about possibly filling the void left by Adam Neumann when he took a reported $1.7 billion to leave his CEO position in the midst of the company’s tumultuous implosion.

Since Legere took the helm of T-Mobile in 2012, the company has boosted shares by 240 percent and grown from the fourth-largest carrier in the U.S. to the third largest, becoming a legitimate competitor to Verizon and AT&T, according to the Journal. If the company succeeds in its planned merger with Sprint, it could move up in the ranks.

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It seems WeWork is hoping that Legere could also turn around the workspace and technology company, which was salvaged last month when its largest shareholder, SoftBank, threw it a multi-billion-dollar life raft.

The New York Times and CNBC report that Legere is just one of the candidates that WeWork is considering for the role. T-Mobile did not immediately respond to a Gizmodo request for comment. WeWork declined to comment.

As CNBC points out, Softbank owns a majority share in Sprint and helped in the recruitment process of Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure who was instrumental in the Sprint and T-Mobile merger before he became an executive chairman at WeWork.

This is your daily reminder that the world is run by a few very large and powerful companies.

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Former senior reporter at Gizmodo

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DISCUSSION

skywalkr
Moose Knuckle

Hey John, how would you like to take over a very unprofitable company that subleases office space but tries to act like a tech company? Oh yeah, and there’s really not any reason to believe they will become profitable at some point because of how poorly the company has been ran.