In the morning of December 7, 1941, two waves of Japanese airplanes loaded with torpedoes and bombs annihilated over 3,500 people, four battleships, two destroyers, and three cruisers. Here's the first "tweet" describing the attack.

The name of the place was Pearl Harbor. The ships were part of the US Navy's Pacific Fleet. The people, citizens of the United States of America. And this was the first notification, sent from the Hawaii navy base to the US Naval Air Station in Kodiak, Alaska. Today, I imagine that it would have looked more or less like this:

Air raid on Pearl Harbor. This is no drill. @JOINTCHIEFSOFSTAFF @CONGRESS @ROOSEVELT Please RT. #USNAVY #USAAF #USARMY #WAR

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The attack could have been fought back: The first wave—which included Nakajima bombers, Aichi dive-bombers, and Mitsubishi Zero fighters—was detected by radar at 136 nautical miles. Unfortunately for the victims—and perhaps fortunately for the rest of the world—the planes were mistaken for USAAF bombers arriving from the continent.

After the attack, the US Congress declared War to Japan at the request of President Roosevelt, entering the clusterfuck we now know as World War II. It was a very sad day, but at least it served Roosevelt to push the country into entering a war that was desperately needing the help of the United States against the most repugnant and evil forces ever to roam the Earth.