EcoModo - The Best of TreeHugger

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This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

racing his electric dragsters on the Bonneville Salt Flats. A circuit board made from soybeans and chicken feathers not only works, but proves to be faster than conventional boards (and without the messy petroleum products). Have a little time to kill? Wake up your fingers and get ready for "Mobile Mayhem," a flash game with info & resources about the perils and benefits of cell phone recycling. They aren't kidding when they warn about it's addictiveness. Speaking of time to kill, Chevy unleashes some marketing genius by allowing internet users to produce their own SUV commercials; the results we saw (and produced ourselves) are probably not what they had in mind, but if the shoe fits...

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Brent Singleton is a pretty busy guy. When he isn't working on dropping a hybrid drive train into a '32 Ford hot rod, he's racing his electric dragsters, both on the track and the Bonneville Salt Flats — an area he's also working to help preserve. His work is being recognized with two major environmental awards: the President's Environmental Youth Award and the Clean Air Excellence Award. Combining clean technologies is not a first for the Singleton family, though. Brent drives to school in an early Ford hybrid station wagon that his father bought from a university. They later outfitted the car with solar panels and a wind turbine on the roof. The car, which runs on gas, electricity, wind, and solar power, has earned a well-deserved moniker: the quadrabrid.

This image was lost some time after publication.
This image was lost some time after publication.

In a recent exhibit in London, a circuit board made from soybeans and chicken feathers drew a great deal of attention (and more than a few odd looks, we're willing to bet). The board was developed by Mingjiang Zhan and Richard Wool in collaboration with Intel, and has proved faster than circuit boards built with conventional, petroleum-based materials. How is that possible? One of our commenters points out that "the chicken feathers make it faster because they have a higher dielectric constant, which means the electrons running around the board will not have to fight with the board to get from a to b. The less electronic interference means faster point to point communication. Also, the thermal coefficient of expansion is lower, so less stress is placed on components once the board heats up." Ah...it all makes sense now.

This image was lost some time after publication.
This image was lost some time after publication.

Flash game-junkies beware: Mobile Mayhem: The Conveyor-Belt Challenge, a virtual recycling game presented by London's Science Museum, has arrived. The fine print, up front: This might be addictive. The game is part of "Dead Ringers?" an online exhibition revealing how wasteful your cell phone is, and what scientists are trying to do about it. "Mobile-recycling can cause mayhem," say the directions, "the greenest option is to take every phone apart and recycle all the bits—easier said then done!" The savvy site also offers a slew of factoids (every hour 1712 mobile phones are "upgraded" in the UK alone) and filmed confessions of "Upgrade Addicts."

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This image was lost some time after publication.
This image was lost some time after publication.

Burgeoning TV producers (and internet time-killers) take note: in a stroke of brilliance, Chevy's ad company dreamed up a contest to make your own ad for the ginormous, gas-guzzling Chevy Tahoe. They let you pick the pictures, add the text and music, and a few clicks later, voila! See how far you can push the censors, and have fun!

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TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.

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