Silently Celebrate Typewriters With This Illustrated Army of Classics

Illustration for article titled Silently Celebrate Typewriters With This Illustrated Army of Classics

There's no denying that typerwriters were (and are!) fantastically complex and beautiful pieces of machinery. They're also noisy, expensive, and a pain to use. With Pop Chart's Visual Compendium of Typewriters though, you can have the best of both worlds: antique art and a backspace key.

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The chart features over 60 hand-illustrations of typerwriters dating all the way back to the 1870s, to more modern marvels like the IBM Selectric I. You can pick up an 18" x 24" print of these old-school word-smithing bad boys at Pop Chat Labs for an introductory sale price of $23. Just think about all the paper you're saving with email, and it's easy to justify the cost. [Pop Chart Labs]

Illustration for article titled Silently Celebrate Typewriters With This Illustrated Army of Classics

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DISCUSSION

In middle school, they offered a class called "personal typing" which the modern equivalent of is probably "keyboarding skills", and the class was taught on what were probably 40s/50s army surplus typewriters. The strike force I had to learn to get the key to hit the paper has ruined many a computer keyboard for me since then. You can not appreciate a modern word processing program without having first made a typo when typing a 5 part carbon paper document. If you typed too fast (yes, it was possible) you would have 2 (or more) keys stuck together that you had to pry apart to release. You can indeed get a buzz from smelling too much White-out (or at least what we considered a buzz in 7th grade).

DING. Left hand up; advance line; return to left margin. AND THE NOISE.