Speculation Smashed: No ZFS in Leopard

Illustration for article titled Speculation Smashed: No ZFS in Leopard

There was a reason ZFS wasn't named-checked as one of Leopard's 10 (not so) new features at WWDC 07—despite declarations by Sun's CEO, Jonathan Schwartz, yesterday Apple denied ZFS's presence in Leopard. Put another way by Brian Croll, senior director of product marketing for OS X: "ZFS is not happening." Ouch.

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But if you read into it and consider InfoWeek's note, "upon further questioning, Croll would only confirm that Apple had never said ZFS would be a part of Leopard," in conjunction with the fact that it was Sun's CEO making the slip, not some random peon, it seems fairly likely that something Sunny was cooking in the Apple kitchen. It's not like they're down and out in any case—Apple's probably already kicking around stuff for 10.6

Apple Says No Sun File System For Leopard [InformationWeek]

[Updated]

"ZFS is not the default file system for Leopard. We are exploring it as a file system option for high-end storage systems with really large storage. As a result, we have included ZFS — a read-only copy of ZFS — in Leopard."

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>From InformationWeek

Apple Clarifies Status of ZFS File System In Mac OS

Apple has included a read-only version ZFS in Leopard as a future file

system option for high-end storage systems.

By Thomas Claburn

InformationWeek

Jun 12, 2007 04:00 PM

Apple now says that the ZFS file system will be available in the

forthcoming Mac operating system, sort of.

Seeking to clarify a statement made on Monday by Brian Croll, senior

director of Mac OS X Product Marketing, to two InformationWeek

reporters that Apple's new "Leopard" operating system would not

include the ZFS file system, an Apple spokesperson indicated that ZFS

would be available as a limited option, but not as the default file

system.

ZFS "is only available a read-only option from the command line,"

according to an Apple spokesperson.

In a follow-up interview today, Croll explained, "ZFS is not the

default file system for Leopard. We are exploring it as a file system

option for high-end storage systems with really large storage. As a

result, we have included ZFS — a read-only copy of ZFS — in

Leopard."

"Read-only means that at a later date, if there are ZFS volumes, those

systems would be able to read ZFS volumes," Croll added. "You cannot

write data into the system. It will allow you to read ZFS volumes

later."

Asked whether ZFS might be implemented for Apple's Xserve rack

mountable server line, Croll said, "Where we head in the future, we're

not able to talk about."

ZFS is a 128-bit open-source file system originally created for Sun's

Solaris operating system. It is widely seen as a more robust

alternative to Apple's current HFS+ file system.

InformationWeek requested a preview copy of "Leopard," but Apple

representatives declined to provide one. Several developers at Apple's

Worldwide Developer Conference who were approached for comment about

Leopard declined to speak, citing non-disclosure agreements with

Apple.

According to one InformationWeek reader posting to our forum under the

name "Akie," ZFS can be accessed through the Disk Utility program,

under the Erase menu. "Sun hasn't got Solaris to run with ZFS as the

boot drive, or at least reliably, so ZFS is only available on non-boot

drives on Sun systems, so this is also the case for Leopard," said

Akie, adding that Leopard includes a new form of RAID called RAID-Z,

"which uses ZFS and overcomes one of the major problems with RAID, the

write hole."

The "write hole" is a problem with the RAID-5 implementation that

permits data loss following a loss of power or crash.