These Intricate Collars Look Like Fish Bones, Are Actually 3D-Printed

Illustration for article titled These Intricate Collars Look Like Fish Bones, Are Actually 3D-Printed

These complex collars look like like they're made from freaky shark jaws or the skeleton of some crazy underwater menace, but they were actually borne directly from a 3D printer. MadLab designer Madeline Gannon did start with an aquatic inspiration, though—the virtual movement of a digital squid.

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Reverberating Across the Divide began with a 3D point cloud of the multi-tentacled creature (technically not a squid, as it's only got five arms…) which was manipulated to "swim" around the neck of a model mannequin.

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A pretty graceful visual trail followed its path, resulting in a kind of chronomorphologic effect, or "composite recording of an object's movement"—a modern-day equivalent to Victorian-era chronophotography made famous by Edweard Muybridge.

Illustration for article titled These Intricate Collars Look Like Fish Bones, Are Actually 3D-Printed

Once the pattern was established, the whole thing was exported to a 3D printer and voila, next-level jewelry and body adornments.

Illustration for article titled These Intricate Collars Look Like Fish Bones, Are Actually 3D-Printed
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Illustration for article titled These Intricate Collars Look Like Fish Bones, Are Actually 3D-Printed

Gannon's got a bunch of fantastic pics on her site of variations on the theme, and I'm picturing a lavish costume party inside this cathedral, where everyone's sporting these adornments and headdresses like this. [@golan]

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DISCUSSION

AttackBunnies88
AttackBunnies88

This looks like 3d printing something for the sake of 3d printing. It doesn't particularly look good and doesn't really serve a purpose. Why?? Unless plastic jewelery becomes in vogue again I can't see any reason for this except some art school grad's final project.