If your machine starts connecting to weird ports or executing unusual PowerShell commands—behavior that’s out of the ordinary for the vast majority of users—WDAPT will flag it to administrators, providing an overview of current and past behavior for admins to look at.

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Microsoft’s also trying to take advantage of the vast Windows install base to kickstart its antivirus program. Millions of suspicious files found on machines worldwide will be run on the cloud, building a giant centralized database of malicious files, but also malicious behavior.

WDAPT will launch later this year as an optional service for companies. But if the benefits of networked antivirus works out—and Microsoft can figure a way to make it work without needing trained IT professionals in the loop—it’s easy to see it make its way to consumers in the future. Hopefully, there’ll be enough time to come up with a better name.

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[Microsoft]


Contact the author at chris@gizmodo.com.