Xbox 360 Scores Exclusive Netflix Movie Streaming, PS3 Cries Blue Tears

Illustration for article titled Xbox 360 Scores Exclusive Netflix Movie Streaming, PS3 Cries Blue Tears

Those Microsoft rascals have scored a big one: The Xbox 360 is now the only game console that will get Netflix video streaming. No Sony PlayStation 3, no Nintendo Wii, no Atari 2600. That's what the Xbox Update page says:

Netflix Partnership

This exclusive partnership offers you the ability to instantly stream movies and TV episodes from Netflix to the television via Xbox 360. Xbox 360 will be the only game console to offer this movie-watching experience, available to Xbox LIVE Gold members who are also Netflix unlimited plan subscribers**, at no additional cost.

From the Netflix Web site, simply add movies and TV episodes to your instant Queue, which will appear automatically on the TV screen via Xbox 360. Once selected, movies will begin playing in as little as 30 seconds. In addition to instantly streaming Netflix movies to the TV, Xbox LIVE Gold members can browse and rate movies, fast-forward, pause and rewind, all using either their Xbox 360 Controller or Universal remote.

Advertisement

Oh Sony, Sony. That has to hurt. A little. In the inside. [Xbox via Endgadget]

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

Long-term, this is bad for Netflix, bad for MS, and bad for consumers on all platforms.

With streaming via gaming systems in its infancy, locking down a major player to one platform will slow the growth of the whole industry.

Yes, it might give MS some slight edge over Sony, but not enough to put Sony out of business, and Netflix doesn't have any real competitors so an exclusive deal is stupid and invites competitors into the market to fill its void.

And, while all this bickering is taking place, the major studios will choose to sit on the sidelines keeping their best content locked in the vaults because they don't want to commit until they see who the winner will be.

All-in-all, a bad move for everyone involved. If the gaming platforms are going to displace the set-top box and cable providers as the content delivery technology of choice, the platforms need to understand that a wall-garden approach simply cannot work.