Zune Ads Hit NYC, Nobody Notices (But Me)

20
Save
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

The word "Zune" is no longer exclusively in the domain of the nerd as Microsoft has started plastering New York City with ads of its portable media player that's poised to solve all of the world's problems. Do we learn anything new from the ads? No, sir, but we do get yet another confirmation on the release date: November 14 (for $249.99, natch). We're also told that Zune is the way music wants to be—that is to say, Windows-only and purchased with Microsoft points. Can't wait for my music to be set free, Microsoft!

Coming Zune [Microsoft]

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

RE: Shared songs via Zune. This quote is from the [zuneinsider.com] blog by a MS employee working on the Zune.

"I misspoke (mis-blogged) on last week's post. We don't actually "wrap all songs up in DRM:" Zune to Zune Sharing doesn't change the DRM on a song, and it doesn't impose DRM restrictions on any files that are unprotected. If you have a song - say that you got "free and clear" - Zune to Zune Sharing won't apply any DRM to that song. The 3-day/3-play limitation is built into the device, and it only applies on the Zune device: when you receive a song in your Inbox, the file remains unchanged. After 3 plays or 3 days, you can no longer play the song; however, you can still see a listing of the songs with the associated metadata."