65,000-Piece Lego Concorde Reveals all the Plane's Inner Workings

Illustration for article titled 65,000-Piece Lego Concorde Reveals all the Planes Inner Workings

In addition to wowing us with a heartbreaking 120,000-piece model of the Titanic breaking in two, Ryan McNaught also spent the month of December building an incredibly-detailed model of an Air France Concorde that reveals all of the supersonic plane’s inner workings and details.

Advertisement
Illustration for article titled 65,000-Piece Lego Concorde Reveals all the Planes Inner Workings

On the right side, McNaught’s 13-foot long Concorde is a near flawless replica of what was once the flagship of Air France’s fleet, perfectly capturing the jet’s curves through some intricate Lego layering.

Advertisement
Illustration for article titled 65,000-Piece Lego Concorde Reveals all the Planes Inner Workings

But move around to the left side and you’ll discover that the model is also a cutaway, revealing where the Concorde stored fuel, cargo, and the passengers willing to pony up thousands for a supersonic trip across the Atlantic.

Illustration for article titled 65,000-Piece Lego Concorde Reveals all the Planes Inner Workings

If you look closely, the inclusion of a croissant in the Concorde’s rear galley is a nice touch given the half-French origins of the aircraft. But seeing how few seats they managed to cram inside the plane is a good indication of why the Boeing 747 was able to put an early end to the Concorde’s career.

Advertisement

[Flickr - Ryan McNaught via The Brothers Brick]

Photos by Ryan McNaught


You’re reading Leg Godt, the blog with the latest Lego news and the best sets on the web. Follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

Advertisement

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

majorsuave
majorsuave

“...But seeing how few seats they managed to cram inside the plane is a good indication of why the Boeing 747 was able to put an early end to the Concorde’s career...”

You do know that the 747 was commercially available over 5 years before the Concorde? And that they both flew together (at least on British Airways and Air France) side by side for nearly 30 years.

One plane was optimized for fast travel, the other for capacity. Fuel prices, the Paris Concorde Crash and 9/11 2001 are causes that contributed to the end of the Concorde, far more directly than a plane that competes in a whole different segment of the industry.