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AirDroid: Control Your Phone and Send Text Messages All From Your Browser

Illustration for article titled AirDroid: Control Your Phone and Send Text Messages All From Your Browser

Pretty much all smartphones are awesome. Regardless of the platform, they do things that would have seemed magical only 10 years ago. But smartphones do have their limitations. Like typing and navigating file structures. AirDroid lets you explore your device and send text messages from your computer.

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What's it do?

AirDroid creates a tiny Android server of sorts when it connects to your Wi-Fi network. Think of it like a reverse remote desktop. From your computer's browser you can manage your device. Surprise, IE isn't recommended. You can transfer files, install applications, and manage music, ringtones, and photos. The best feature is the ability to send and reply to SMS messages from your browser.

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Why do we like it?

I'm sending text SMS messages from my Android phone via my browser. I can't stress how great that is. Now if you're a Sprint customer with Google Voice Integration, this isn't new. But for everyone else, it's pretty dope. Plus, I'm able to install apps, add music and photos, and check on my device's storage availability from a browser. On the phone, I can check memory and CPU usage. Kindle Fire owners can use it to side load apps from the Android Marketplace. Of course you have to side load AirDroid first.

Illustration for article titled AirDroid: Control Your Phone and Send Text Messages All From Your Browser

Sprd the Note

Download this app for:

The Best

Send SMS from computer

The Worst

No Android 4.0 support

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DISCUSSION

Back in the day *before* I got on the Android bandwagon, I was a ho for Bluephone Elite. Man, that thing made my phone and my Mac have sex and have wonderful integration babies. iTunes shut down when the phone rang, caller ID flashed up on my screen, and I could take the calls on my computer.

But he never supported Android, and I was more committed to the potential of my phone's OS than the phone/laptop integration. And then he shut down development entirely. But those were halcyon days. I'm not sure why no one seems interested in offering *all* that in a package today for Android (do they have it for iPhone or Blackberry?). Still, this seems like a chunk.