HD DVD vs. Xbox Live Marketplace: Why There's No Big Difference

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

How can an Xbox Live WMV encoded video which has 720p/1080i and only 6.5 Megabits per second (VBR) compare to an HD DVD, which has the potential to go up to 1080p and 36.55 Megabits per second? It can, and it turns out there's not as much difference between the two as you might think.

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By recording and comparing two clips, one HD DVD and one XBL WMV, Brandon Wirtz and Jake Ludington came to the conclusion that there's really no noticible difference between the two if you don't have a 1080p TV that's been correctly calibrated. Other than the fact that Windows Media Encoded files can't display true blacks because it's calibrated for NTSC color space instead of ATSC color space, there ain't that much to report.

In short, unless you're a true videophile that spent hours calibrating your TV, have a 1080p set, and have a theatre-lit room, you probably won't notice the difference.

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This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

Why Xbox Live Video Marketplace Competes Well Visually With HD-DVD [XYHD via Jake Ludington via eHomeUpgrade]

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DISCUSSION

manhattan01-old
manhattan01

I don't know...I've got the Avia calibration CD...takes about 40 minutes to setup - you have to adjust the lighting in the room to what you would normally be watching your shows at...it takes even longer if you want to calibrate sound but that's not the issue.

I've got two TV's, one is calibrated before I moved. I've never calibrted it again to consider differences in lighting...nor have I calibrated the second TV. Why? Because calibration is subjective. You're asked to match colours, line up lines, judge this, judge that. It takes a long time but what you think is right, may not be. IF the Avia calibration were free and it took 15 minutes and I knew that what I was setting up was correct, then sure...I'd calibrate my sets.

Anyway, I know what you mean...if you're going to test something, don't test it at subpar levels. Test it are performance level (tuned) specifications.