iRiver iAMOLED Hands On

Illustration for article titled iRiver iAMOLED Hands On

We got our hands on that pretty iRiver iAMOLED Photo Tank, and it's plenty handy. The only problem is, the most appealing aspect of it is its active matrix OLED (AMOLED) screen, and in this mockup, it wasn't working yet. The real thing won't see the light of day until Q3, but until then, we'll just ogle this gallery of the palm-sized player.

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Illustration for article titled iRiver iAMOLED Hands On
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Illustration for article titled iRiver iAMOLED Hands On
Illustration for article titled iRiver iAMOLED Hands On
Illustration for article titled iRiver iAMOLED Hands On
Illustration for article titled iRiver iAMOLED Hands On
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Illustration for article titled iRiver iAMOLED Hands On

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DISCUSSION

permissionmag-old
permissionmag

I really like the sort of retro-utilitarian looks of this thing, and I love all the video codecs that are listed on the shell.

iRiver has always been one of my favorite device makers, because they're willing to try new things, and not just make "me too" players.

The more I look, though, the more potential negatives I see. Clearly the screen is not nearly as large as the faceplate would suggest - the wasted half-inch or so around the edges would bug me every day.

Not a fan of the point-and-shoot camera style selector wheel on the front. I always forget what the little icons mean, and it's a very fiddly way of setting the functional mode for a device.

That big wheel sticking out perpendicular to the face seems like a problem, too. Just enough to annoy you if you cram it into a picket, certainly going to get moved accidentally in a jacket or bag, and probably the first thing that is going to physically break.

All of the little buttons, like the "back" and "ok," look like they would take concentration to acquire every time you want them, too.

Bravo for original thinking, but not enough thought given to usability for my taste.