Subway Workers Discover Ancient Roman Ruins

Image: AP/Alessandra Tarantino
Image: AP/Alessandra Tarantino

If you build a new Metro line in Rome, you have to worry about more than just engineering. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the construction team working on the Metro C, which will run through the center of the city, has now unearthed a huge suite of ancient barracks.

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Associated Press reports that the ancient Roman ruins date back to the reign of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century AD. The buildings are thought to be the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards, and the site could cover as much as 10,000 square feet. One of the uncovered sections includes a 330-foot hallway with 39 rooms. It looks pretty, but it’s sure going to put a dent on the opening date of the new line.

Illustration for article titled Subway Workers Discover Ancient Roman Ruins
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Illustration for article titled Subway Workers Discover Ancient Roman Ruins
Illustration for article titled Subway Workers Discover Ancient Roman Ruins
Illustration for article titled Subway Workers Discover Ancient Roman Ruins
Illustration for article titled Subway Workers Discover Ancient Roman Ruins
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Contributing Editor at Gizmodo. An ex-engineer writing about science and technology.

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DISCUSSION

mrgoodbeer
mrgoodbeer

How does “street level” change over time? I understand sedimentation from a river, Pompeii makes sense, but what about finds like this in continuously inhabited areas? How do they end up so far down? It’s as if every time someone walked by over the last two thousand years someone dropped a handful of dirt.