Take a Quick Tour of the Mind-Boggling Universe of Mathematics

Image: Dominic Walliman/YouTube
Image: Dominic Walliman/YouTube

Math is often considered synonymous with pain, boredom and frustration. It’s not uncommon to hear someone say, “ugh, it’s like doing math.” But math is beautiful in theory, miraculous when applied, and awe-inspiring at every turn.

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Even if a person is entirely allergic to the idea of digging into the nitty-gritty of crunching numbers, it doesn’t mean they can’t appreciate the diversity and implications of math. While an artistic temperament is often considered the exact opposite of the kind of personality that loves complicated equations, pure mathematicians are really just a bunch of lunatics endlessly working with abstraction and beauty. And folks who work in fields of applied mathematics often end up finding a use for those abstract ideas.

One might not have the background to experience wonder from a particular equation, but virtually anyone can appreciate the astonishing human progression from basic counting to creating full-on artificial intelligence that could outpace our own mental faculties.

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Understanding that non-linear advance is where a new video by the engaging and inventive physicist Dominic Walliman comes in. With just a bit of dry humor, he takes viewers through the major fields of math starting at the beginning and shows us how they inform and relate to each other. A few interesting details jump out, including Walliman’s insight that to properly connect the various sub-disciplines of math would require more than a 2D map—it’d require a 3D web. And in reality, the study of math’s foundations has yet to discover a complete and consistent set of axioms.

Why? It’s an incredible mystery.

[DominicWalliman]

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DISCUSSION

imadeapigeonrat
I made a pigeonrat

I love math, I always have. It’s so disappointing and frustrating to hear people almost brag with glee about how much they suck at math, and assume everyone has an antagonistic attitude towards math. I bought a pop-sci book about math once that opened with “I know you hate math and it was your most hated subject in school, but I’m going to try to show you that math isn’t evil. I promise!” (I’m paraphrasing) That put me off reading the book. Why would I even buy a book about math if I hate it?