The Boat in the Suez Canal Is Still Stuck, But You Can Now Stick It Anywhere You Want With This App

How the Ever Given could stop sea level rise.
How the Ever Given could stop sea level rise.
Screenshot: Brian Kahn (Gizmodo) / Ever Given Ever Ywhere

For all who have been captivated by the Ever Given, the ginormous shipping container boat that has been stuck in the Suez Canal for days, we have some good news. Before you get excited, no, the boat’s still stuck. But you can now stick the Ever Given anywhere you please thanks to the clever people of the internet, specifically one Garrett Dash Nelson.

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On Sunday, Nelson published on Twitter that he had made an app titled Ever Given Ever Ywhere on the coding website Glitch that allows anyone to “get the Ever Given stuck” in a variety of places. It allows you to rotate the boat, make the boat bigger, make the boat smaller, or put it to scale. Now, where else can a giant container boat get stuck? Just use your imagination. Nelson decided to stick it in Boston Harbor, the Hudson River, the Panama Canal, and the Bellagio in Las Vegas.

“I took 10 minutes out of my life to create a @glitchapp that lets you wedge the Ever Given anywhere you want in the world,” Nelson, the curator of maps and director of geographic scholarship at the Leventhal Map & Education Center, wrote.

Other users on Twitter gleefully joined in, using it to create a new border wall with Mexico or inserting it into Michelangelo’s famous “Creation of Adam” painting. Gizmodo’s very own Brian Kahn thought the Ever Given would be a great way to solve sea level rise.

Nelson encouraged people who enjoyed the app to consider supporting the Leventhal Map & Education Center.

The joy generated by Nelson’s app is reminiscent to what the internet experienced when the image of Sen. Bernie Sanders sitting at President Joe Biden’s inauguration went viral in January. Soon after, people starting using generators and websites to put Sanders in all kinds of places. One of the most popular generators, Put Bernie Anywhere!, stated that a total of 9.8 million memes of the senator had been created with the website before its creator shut it down because of API costs.

As far the real Ever Given goes, it’s still in the Suez Canal blocking shipping traffic. Although the situation—and the photos, let’s be honest—is pretty funny, it’s also a very serious problem. There are about 320 ships waiting to obtain access, according to the Wall Street Journal, which notes that roughly 13% of global maritime trade and 10% of seaborne oil shipments pass through the Suez Canal.

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DISCUSSION

Hey big Suez people, maybe it’s time for an upgrade or even a side-grade, with a sister canal?

How long would it take to make back the construction costs?