Adobe AIR for Smartphones Wants to Be One Platform to Rule Them All

Illustration for article titled Adobe AIR for Smartphones Wants to Be One Platform to Rule Them All

Adobe's launching AIR, its cross-platform runtime, for smartphones. Why's that a big deal? It theoretically means developers can write an app once, and it'll work on tons of OSes—at least any that support AIR. Oh, and the iPhone.

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Illustration for article titled Adobe AIR for Smartphones Wants to Be One Platform to Rule Them All

Android's the first to get AIR, but WebOS, BlackBerrry and Windows Mobile are slated to get it too. And remember Adobe's initiative to push Flash apps onto the App Store for the iPhone? Apps developed for that will work just fine in AIR on other phones, letting Adobe have their iPhone cake and eat it too.

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Illustration for article titled Adobe AIR for Smartphones Wants to Be One Platform to Rule Them All

I saw an early build of it running on a Droid and Nexus One, where we messed with a couple of apps, like one streaming live video from a computer, and it's pretty impressive stuff, with multitouch and close-to-native performance in some instances. If AIR succeeds the way Adobe hopes, it'll be what Java once promised to be, a way to write once for tons of platforms. That's a not-insignificant-sized "if" though. [Adobe]

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DISCUSSION

happycamperjack-old
happycamperjack

I don't think people understand why flash was not on iphone. Like Java, Flash runs on top of a virtual machine. So it's not optimized for anything, therefore not ideal for mobile devices due to power and battery constraints. It's like Flash is speaking a different language than iphone requiring a translator, while AIR speaks the same language as iphone. So there's no reason for apple to block it. In fact Apple wants developers to port Flash stuffs over.