Backstory and Teardown of the Lenovo X300 (Components By Weight!)

Illustration for article titled Backstory and Teardown of the Lenovo X300 (Components By Weight!)

Here's an interesting bit: The Lenovo x300 almost had the old IBM butterfly keyboard of old. This detail and others were revealed in a Businessweek cover story on the ultrathin, quickly being recognized as the antithesis to the Apple Air. The piece has a lot of other interesting background, like the above info graphic of a teardown with weight for each component. Also, it nearly had a 10-inch screen.

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Businessweek's headline confuses me, a bit: Building the Perfect Laptop. David Hill, father of the x300 and chief Lenovo designer says, "I'm a bit tired of looking at silver computers. I'd never wear a silver business suit." The comparison is lost on me. Many of the people the Air was designed for simply wouldn't wear a business suit; why is wearing a suit a given for computer user? Sounds like the same kind of thinking that kept IBM trailing in the personal computer race before Windows. The piece is worth reading, especially for the opening section where the Lenovo people, tuned into Macworld Keynote coverage, scrambled to see if the x300 also fit into a manila envelope. It did. [BusinessWeek via BBG, more X300 on Giz]

Butterfly Keyboard:

Illustration for article titled Backstory and Teardown of the Lenovo X300 (Components By Weight!)

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DISCUSSION

@Savager:

Regardless of what you might think, I'm not taking sides in the debate, but how can you call a proprietary external optical drive "simplicity"? How can you call only one USB port and a non-replaceable battery "functionality"? "Design" is one thing that I can't argue with, but what's "creative" about a laptop? What you DO with it might be considered creative, but I can promise you that the laptop had nothing to do with it. Paint brushes do not an artist make, nor does pen & paper make a great writer.