Google: Spend More Time Talking to People, Than Asking Siri About the Weather

Illustration for article titled Google: Spend More Time Talking to People, Than Asking Siri About the Weather

The head Android honcho over at Google, Andy Rubin, had a few choice words to say about the iPhone 4S' personal assistant Siri. According to Rubin, we should spend more time talking with actual people than with our phones, and that Apple's technology "isn't a new notion."

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Speaking at the AsiaD conference, Rubin added "I don't believe that your phone should be an assistant" though tasty desserts they totally should be. Right, Rubin? [All Things D via TechRadar via Gizmodo UK]


Illustration for article titled Google: Spend More Time Talking to People, Than Asking Siri About the Weather

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DISCUSSION

reckless1966
Reckless1966

You know I really dislike when company executives are intellectually dishonest. A phone is already a digital assistant. Siri is just another interfacing method, and one that is a lot more convenient for certain tasks....and those tasks will expand over time.

It's a lot faster and more convenient to hold down the home button and say "wake me at 8:15 tomorrow morning" than it is to go to clocks, click on alarms, and scroll around with your finger and then press save.

It's idiotic for an executive to say something dismissive like this unless they truly don't plan to add these kinds of features to their phones. (Or more accurately, to their phone OS.) But you know damn well that they will. Google does a lot with voice and translation and so on and there is obviously customer demand for this type of interface.

And also to say it isn't a "new notion". Well no kidding. the notion has been around for decades, but this is the most impressive actual implementation of this idea that's been available in a consumer device.

Nowadays executives seem to have a hard time ever admitting that competing companies have anything worthwhile. I'd have a lot more respect for him if he said, "Siri on the iPhone 4S is pretty cool. There are a lot of limitations though in its current form. We are working on similar technology and when we release it, it will be more mature than what Siri is offering right now." or "While Siri has some cool functionality, we see the current limitations as being a big problem. We are researching similar tech and when we feel we have overcome many of those limitations, you'll see it in Android." See? Was that so hard? And it's probably completely accurate to say something like that. After all, Google isn't likely to introduce a Siri like interface down the road that isn't at least as good as what Siri offers now.