LG Updates Its 10.1-inch G Pad With a Modest Spec Bump

Illustration for article titled LG Updates Its 10.1-inch G Pad With a Modest Spec Bump

LG’s G Pad II is an upgrade for the G Pad series, famously copied for the much-loved Nexus 7. But aside from a decently-sized battery, this new tab is pretty run-of-the-mill.

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The G Pad II won’t make an official debut next week at IFA 2015 in Berlin, so we’re still in the dark about prices and usability, but if specs are any indicator, we’re looking at maybe one of the cheaper options out there. For one, the G Pad’s processor, the Snapdragon 800, is about two years old but will run the up-to-date Android 5.1.1 Lollipop. The 10.1-inch screen comes in at about 224 pixels-per-inch, a steep decrease compared to the upcoming, 9.7-inch Galaxy Tab S2 from Samsung.

The only semi-exciting thing packed into this device is this device’s potential for decent battery life with a 7,400 mAh battery coupled with a more energy-efficient processor. It also comes in bronze and...also bronze. Yes, that’s the only color option. The G Pad II will also be gunning for Kindles and Nooks everywhere with its included e-reading mode that reduces blue light output. You’ll be able to (supposedly) read for hours without getting a headache.

So yeah, not the most exciting tablet ever created, especially in a world where iPads and Android tablets alike are getting bigger and bigger. But if a cheap tab, running the latest Android with decent battery life, is all you need? Then G Pad: The Sequel might be worth a look.

[LG]

Illustration for article titled LG Updates Its 10.1-inch G Pad With a Modest Spec Bump

DISCUSSION

pessimippopotamus
Pessimippopotamus

I’d say going from SD400 to SD800 is more than modest. The screen should be less awful too since the original’s resolution was just 1280 x 800. The biggest issue with the old tablet was 1GB of RAM, which also seems to have been fixed. I thought of getting the original as a replacement for my mom’s aging (but still trucking) 2012 Nexus 7 once, but it wasn’t worth the $250 asking price.

If the price—and most importantly the depreciation—remains the same as its predecessor, then I don’t think it’s that bad of a value.

The 10.1-inch screen comes in at about 224 pixels-per-inch, a steep decrease compared to the upcoming, 9.7-inch Galaxy Tab S2 from Samsung.

Samsung’s low-end 10in tablet actually has a 1280 x 800 screen with SD400 that they’re selling for $280. The Tab S2 is not aiming for the same market as the G Pad II.