Image: Regal Cinemas

MoviePass may be limping along in zombie form, just waiting for some finance bro to put it out of its misery, but its unlimited subscription model continues to spread and mutate. On Friday, Regal Cinemas announced that it’s launching its own version of an unlimited movie plan that should be a pretty decent deal for anyone who sees more than one movie a month.

The halcyon days of paying 10 bucks a month to see as many movies as you want at any theater you choose were short-lived and will probably never return. But the basic concept seems to be working out for AMC with its more expensive in-house subscription service. And today, Regal told us how its rival service will work.

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The most important thing is that you’ll pay $18-23.50 per month for unlimited movies at Regal theaters. There are three tiers with three different prices, and paying more gets you access to a wider variety of Regal theaters. There are some concession bonuses and a $0.50 “convenience fee” for each ticket, but for the most part, it’s pretty straightforward. There will also be surcharges for special formats like 4DX and IMAX. Anyone who lived through bad days of MoviePass forcing customers to jump through hoops only to find themselves disappointed should find Regal’s promises appealing. Here’s the full breakdown of the tiers:

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Customers will use Regal’s app to make their ticket purchases and will have to present ID at the theater. The app is tied to the customer’s phone and only the subscription holder can use it, sidestepping the issues with fraud that MoviePass found itself dealing with. (Regal would, presumably, also like to avoid the other kinds of issues with fraud that MoviePass was sorting out with New York’s Attorney General last year.)

Regal did not return Gizmodo’s request for comment, but Deadline claims that the service will launch before the end of July.

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Soon, we’ll be suffering the from the same overload of theater subscription programs as we are with streaming services, but it feels more like a win for everyone. Many people live in an area where a Regal is their only moviegoing choice. The bigger worry is whether theaters will follow in MoviePass’s footsteps and constantly make adjustments to its terms to the point that no one even understands what the deal is. Enjoy the clarity while it lasts.