Researchers Develop Tech That Lets Surveillance Cameras Text to Say Hello 

Researchers at Purdue University have found a new way to get surveillance cameras to “talk” to the people they see. The system is called PHADE, which stands for “private human addressing,” and it enables cameras to send messages to people’s devices when they’ve entered a specific area without collecting their personal…

Facebook's Data-Sharing Program for Phone Makers Included Chinese Telecom Giant Huawei

This weekend, news broke in the New York Times that Facebook’s habit of giving extensive user data to third parties extended to “at least 60 device makers” who were granted access to private Facebook APIs over the past decade. The social media giant has been trying to quash the story by insisting developers were only…

Amazon's Plan to Scan Your Face Even Has Police Worried It's Too Creepy, New Emails Show

Across the country, law enforcement agencies are teaming up with data firms to bring facial recognition to public spaces, including airports, schools, and even protests. Most of these efforts remain clouded in secrecy, but newly released documents from Oregon officials using Amazon’s facial recognition offer our…

School Districts Can Hardly Wait to Start Tracking Kids With Police State-Style Face Recognition

The most advanced technology in schools is no longer found only in classrooms, computer labs, and libraries. It’s in the networked cameras angled for maximum visibility, the weapons detectors at entrances, and soon, in an advanced surveillance system designed to identify threats—and it may be turned on students as…

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UK Watchdog Calls for Face Recognition Ban Over 90 Percent False-Positive Rate

A privacy watchdog group in the UK is calling for a ban on automated face recognition technologies after a report revealed staggeringly high false-positive rates. Big Brother Watch has released a report, titled “Face Off: The Lawless Growth of Facial Recognition in UK Policing,” detailing abuses of the tech, which the…

A Telecom Loophole Lets This Shady Company Give Anyone's Location to the Cops

A case in which a Missouri sheriff is accused of illegally tracking citizen’s cellphone location for personal reasons is putting the spotlight on a little-known service that allows police to gain people’s location data with little oversight. The complex scheme involves the practices of telemarketers, inmate call…