We live on a spectacular, bizarre, wonderful, weird, confusing, awe-inspiring planet. NASA’s Earth Day campaign sent me hunting for a few of the places that leave me delighted. Where are your favourite spots on this strange planet of ours?

Top image: Lake Gairdner National Park in South Australia contains the largest salt lakes in Australia during flood season, and vast, dry salt pans during the dry season. Credit: JAXA/ESA

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The Eye of the Sahara glares at astronauts from the desert. Image credit: NASA/Roscosmos/Oleg Artemyev Hermanovitch

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Terraces climb from the valley floors into the hills in Sichuan, China to create ever-more rice paddies. Image credit: Planet Labs

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The confluence of the Mattagami River and Missinaibi River into the Moose River in winter is simply beautiful. Image credit: NASA/ESA/Paolo Nespoli

The Caspian Sea is the largest landlocked water body in the world, dyed green with phosphorus-triggered algae blooms. Image credit: KARI/ESA

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The Betsiboka estuary of Madagascar marks the end of the country’s largest river. Image credit: JAXA/ESA

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9 Eyes in the Pacific Ocean never fails to impress. Image credit: NASA

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Mangroves cluster around the branching streams of Keep River Inlet in Australia. Image credit: Planet Labs

The Land of Terror is a dramatic windscape of sedimentary rocks. Image credit: ESA

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The clay, sand, and salt of Iran’s Dasht-e Kavir salt desert is laid bare by raging winds, exposing the gentle curves of sedimentary rocks. Image credit: EUSI

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The Tongue of the Ocean in the Bahamas is 100% slurping awesomeness. Image credit: NASA

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Sediment makes this estuary in Western Australia outstandingly pretty. Image credit: NASA/USGS Landsat/Geoscience Australia