This Helmet Crafted from Sustainable Wood and Cork Is as Safe as Your Plastic and Foam One

Illustration for article titled This Helmet Crafted from Sustainable Wood and Cork Is as Safe as Your Plastic and Foam One

The general rise of artisanal wares over the past few years hasn't been particularly shocking. But to see that trend spill over into safety products—almost exclusively the domain of science, technology and research—is a bit strange. Especially when it's a bike helmet meant to protect your brain.

Advertisement

Coyle bike helmets use different woods—firs, maples, oaks, etc.—to keep your head intact while bike riding. Inside, according to Bike Rumor, the helmet uses cork instead of foam, which, according to the manufacturer. stands up to all the same safety tests any other helmet has to withstand (but wasn't officially tested by the government, as they won't certify custom helmets).

But you will pay for this dandy-ized safety product: helmets range between $265 and $350. But hey, at least you won't look like a complete and utter geek.

Illustration for article titled This Helmet Crafted from Sustainable Wood and Cork Is as Safe as Your Plastic and Foam One

[Coyle via Bike Rumor]

DISCUSSION

AmphetamineCrown
AcetyleneCrown

I found this intriguing, and went both to the source article and Coyle's website. First, I'm not sure I consider this "sustainable." The implication is that these aren't built up from laminates—like an Eames chair—but rather CNC'd out of a rather large block of wood. That seems like 99% waste to me.

Second, with respect to the safety claims... My read of their FAQ is that they have tested some helmets, but then note that their helmets as a product line are NOT certified. While I express sympathy with their view that the certification process is geared towards mass production—presumably the compliance of their helmets will depend up on each block of wood used—I don't find that reassuring from a safety perspective. I don't care if some other helmet has passed or not, I care that one just like what I'm wearing has passed. Obviously, with wood, each is unique. That may be good from an artistic perspective, but I'm having a hard time trusting my noggin to them on that basis.