Uncensored version of Oscar Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray finally published

It's only taken 120 years, but the full text of Oscar Wilde's novel The Picture of Dorian Gray has finally gotten published. Wilde's editor J.M. Stoddart removed a large amount of "objectionable" material from the book prior to its first appearance in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in June 1890, including "a number of things which an innocent woman would make an exception to." But after its first magazine publication caused a public outcry for its decadence, Wilde was forced to make deeper cuts, removing a lot of the homoeroticism from the book before it first appeared in book form in 1891.

Now, at last, Harvard University Press is publishing Wilde's original text. Editor Nicholas Frankel, an associate professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University, told the Guardian, "the time is ripe for the publication of Wilde's novel in its uncensored form … It is the version of the novel that Wilde, I believe, would want us to be reading in the 21st century … I'm bringing it out of the closet a little more." More details at the link. [Guardian]

DISCUSSION

oldwookiee-old
Oldwookiee

I will have to get it, but I'm of two minds about unexpurgated republishings. I'm of the opinion that occasionally constraints on writers, whether imposed by themselves or editors, can be beneficial. (note: I consider this different from government censorship)

I have a copy of Huckleberry Finn with an added "lost" chapter, and I don't know whether I consider it or the other version a "proper" version.