AQUOS X Is World's Thinnest Production TV, Says Sharp

Illustration for article titled AQUOS X Is Worlds Thinnest Production TV, Says Sharp

The new Sharp AQUOS X series are only 1.35 inches deep, which is thinner than their old IFA bags and, according to Sharp, makes them the world's thinnest LCD televisions in production. All of them have full high definition resolution at 37, 42 and 47 inches. What is Sharp thinning trick this time? Among other things, all the tuner and in/out connections are in a separate box, which is connected to the panel by a single cable (Ed: like my old Philips Flat TV.) The rest of the specs look very good.

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Illustration for article titled AQUOS X Is Worlds Thinnest Production TV, Says Sharp
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Illustration for article titled AQUOS X Is Worlds Thinnest Production TV, Says Sharp
Illustration for article titled AQUOS X Is Worlds Thinnest Production TV, Says Sharp

Sharp claims a 15,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio (900:1 absolute) for these LCDs, and a 450 cd/m2 brightness with double-speed 120 Hz refresh rate and 176 degree viewing angle. A proprietary 12-bit processor, designed to give smooth tone variations, handles the color processing. The system has 3 HDMI inputs along with analog and digital tuners. It has a thin-profile 8-speaker soundsystem integrated in the chassis, with a 1-bit digital amplifier.

Putting about 10 pounds of electronics in the separate tuner box means that the 46 inch model weighs only about 48 pounds, which will be great for your back if you hang it. It will be available in Japan this March for ¥350,000 ($3,290) for the LC-B-37XJ1, ¥430,000 ($4,050) for the LC-B-42XJ1, and ¥480,000 ($4,510) for the big LC-B-46XJ1. [AV Watch]

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DISCUSSION

@InfoMofo: Whooooooa.

As for the TV, I see the merit of external electronics, particularly (doesn't show from the pictures) if all of the connections go there, and only one cable does in fact go to the TV. Very iMac-esque from a clutter-reduction perspective.

But I, too, would trade much thickness (ok, SOME thickness) for durability and bullet-proof-ness. Put a big slab of sapphire glass on the front of my LCD and I'm a happy man; make the innards equally robust and you have a friend for life.

Look, I just pitched two old tv's. One, because my son took a REALLY strong magnet and held it to the screen; bad for the mask and thus the picture. The second because the tuner wouldn't handle anything above channel 35. Both of these sets were well over 20 years old, and would be servicable if I weren't picky. (The latter will still be a great video and game platform for the kiddies.) THAT's the kind of life we need to build into these devices, and to blazes with the thickness. Harumph.