Ouya, the little Kickstarter Android console that was pretty popular until people actually started using it, has had a quiet year. But a new report says that Razer, who’s had there own troubles breaking the Android-based gaming market with Forge TV, might be joining forces with the little console that couldn’t.

Technology is filled with all kinds of rumors and speculation — real and fabricated. BitStream collects all those whispers into one place to deliver your morning buzz.

TechCrunch reports that Razer, well-known for gaming laptops and peripherals, “is in the process” of acquiring Ouya, though the details haven’t been completely hammered out. No doubt Razer would use Ouya’s tech and know-how to improve their own set-top gaming system or possible forge (yeah, I said it) an all-new console. Of course, two wrongs don’t really make a right—and both these consoles have a lot of wrongs that need fixing. I guess we’ll see what happens.

[TechCrunch via Android Police]


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