Most of us are the children or grandchildren of the generation that fought in World War II—we have the luxury of thinking about the war as history. In the great 2005 movie Walk on Water, we watch as the descendants of both German and Jewish grandparents grapple with their predecessors' actions in the present.

The film, by Israeli director Eytan Fox, follows a young star agent in Mossad whose single-minded ambition is focused on domestic terrorism, not Germany in 1945. But an unexpected and unwanted assignment sends him on a mission to seek out and kill an elderly Nazi war criminal living in Germany. What seems like an annoying chore turns into something more complex as he befriends the grandchildren of the criminal as part of the operation.

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It's a beautifully shot film that oscillates between English, German, and Hebrew as it moves from inner-city Berlin to Tel Aviv to wealthy German suburbs, but its real power is in its portrayal of average humans coming to terms with their relationship to history. You can stream it for a couple bucks on Amazon, and it's well worth it. [Amazon]


Welcome to Movie Night, where Gizmodo staffers tell you what you should be streaming tonight.

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